From the Archive: Lectures from Past Seasons

Share
  • The Tehran Children -- Primer Content: Sara J. Bloomfield

    Originally recorded at 10:45 a.m. EDT Monday, August 13, 2018, Sara J. Bloomfield's talk at the Chautauqua Amphitheater is released from our archives as we prepare to premiere "The Tehran Children: Iran's Unexpected & Suppressed Connection to the Holocaust" - a program curated for CHQ Assembly in...

  • The Tehran Children -- Primer Content -- Elie Wiesel

    Originally recorded at 10:45 a.m. EDT Monday, July 27, 2009, the late Elie Wiesel's talk at the Chautauqua Amphitheater is released from our archives as we prepare to premiere "The Tehran Children: Iran's Unexpected & Suppressed Connection to the Holocaust" - a program curated for CHQ Assembly in...

  • Sarah Lewis (2019)

    Originally recorded at 10:45 a.m. ET Tuesday, August 20, 2019.

    Sarah Lewis, an award-winning scholar, best-selling author, and professor at Harvard University, distills for the audience the “Vision & Justice” course she teaches at Harvard — a class that the school incorporated into its core curr...

  • The Lingering Legacy of Confederate Statues

    Originally recorded on August 14, 2019.

    Stan Deaton, Senior historian and Dr. Elaine B. Andrews Distinguished Historian at the Georgia Historical Society, examines the lingering legacy of Confederate Statues in a lecture given at Chautauqua on August 14, 2019.

    About Chautauqua Institution: Chau...

  • A Gentleman in Moscow

    Originally broadcast at 3:30 p.m. EDT Thursday, July 19, 2018.

    A transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel, A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in an elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov.

    When, in 1922, Rostov is deem...

  • Four Steps for Racial Equality

    Originally broadcast at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019.

    The Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton details the path forward to reach equality, and recalls his own experience as a Black man in America. Sutton, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, speaks to the status of racial equality in the U.S., d...

  • The Third Reconstruction Period

    Originally broadcast at 2:00 p.m. EDT Wednesday, August 3, 2016.

    The Rev. William J. Barber II passionately discusses his view of the Third Reconstruction period in American history — we're living it. He highlights the first two reconstruction periods, and draws the parallels to the current civi...

  • A Week With Fr. Richard Rohr (2019)

    4 videos

  • Diplomatic Moments That Changed the World

    Originally recorded on July 17, 2018.

    William J. Burns recounts world-historic diplomatic events that helped shape where we are today. He discusses the Cold War being a “plastic moment,” the eventual fall of the Soviet Union and current relations with Russia.

    Burns, president of the Carnegie ...

  • Political Tribalism and Identity Politics

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Friday, June 6, 2018.

    Amy Chua dissects tribalism and identity politics within the American political spectrum. The John M. Duff Professor of Law at Yale Law School further discusses demagogic politicians, political tribes and threatened demographics.

    Ch...

  • Fostering Community, Shedding ‘Tribal Mentality’

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Thursday, July 5, 2018.

    David Brooks speaks about politics, tribal mentality and community. Describing himself as “bookish,” he tells stories about his infatuation with writing, consciousness and the “tribal mentality” of politics.

    Brooks is an op-ed colu...

  • The Other Face of Power

    Originally broadcast at 2 p.m. EDT Monday, August 12, 2019.

    Bill Moyers explains why soft power has no limits for nations around the world. Moyers, a broadcast journalist for more than four decades, details how hard power — force — has limits while soft power, the ability to persuade, is the opp...

  • The Past, Present and Future of the Great Lakes

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Wednesday, June 24, 2019.

    2019 CLSC author Dan Egan discusses with Chautauqua’s Emily Morris the historical and ongoing mismanagement of America's Great Lakes. Egan, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter, provides a look into his book The Death and Life of ...

  • A Comprehensive Look at U.S.-Russia Relations

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Monday, July 16, 2018.

    On the day the presidents of the United States and Russia held a historic summit in Helsinki, Sen. Chris Coons breaks down the state of relations between the west and Russia, discuss Donald Trump’s presidency, current relations with R...

  • Self Reflection & History of Spoken Word Tradition

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Friday, July 26, 2019.

    Joshua Bennett offers thoughts on — and demonstrates — the power of the spoken word, detailing his journey as a poet and as an educator, and explaining the role of poetry in his life and in the world.

    Bennett is the Mellon Assistant...

  • Exploring the 'New Map of Life'

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Monday, July 15, 2019.

    Laura Carstensen examines the effects of a rapid increase in human life expectancy. The founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity dissects trends that have created an aging population. In her lecture, she lays out the “new...

  • The Importance of Ecological Conservation

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Wednesday, July 10, 2019.

    Rae Wynn-Grant is a conservation scientist, large-carnivore ecologist, nature storyteller, and advocate with expertise in using emerging technology to identify how humans are changing the way carnivores use landscapes.

    She is curr...

  • Charlottesville’s Response to White Supremacist Violence

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Thursday, July 4, 2019.

    Risa Goluoff details the initial reaction to the fallout of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville in 2017. The first female dean of the University of Virgina School of Law, she recalls the Charlottesville rally, neo-Nazi movem...

  • 5 Ways to Be Witty

    Originally recorded on July 31, 2019.

    James Geary is the deputy curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, and the author of Wit's End: What Wit Is, How It Works, and Why We Need It, in which he explores every facet of wittiness, and how it is more than simply being funny.

    Gear...

  • The #MeToo Movement’s Role in Shifting Power and Privilege

    Originally broadcast at 10:45 a.m. EDT Friday, August 16, 2019.

    Tarana J. Burke speaks with Chautauqua’s Emily Morris about the role the famous hashtag has played in society. Burke, founder of the Me Too Movement, discusses the impact of #MeToo, her work with Just Be Inc. in Selma and the inspir...

  • Creating “We”: African American and Latinx Identity

    Originally recorded on August 22, 2019.

    Smithsonian curator Ariana A. Curtis highlights the importance of non-white narratives in museums, speaking from her experience as a museum curator and as an Afro-Latina and African American from Western Massachusetts.

    A Fulbright Scholar, Curtis is the ...

  • Individual Action and Collective Climate Change Reversal

    Originally recorded on August 15, 2019.

    Bill McKibben is an author, environmentalist and co-founder of anti-carbon campaign group 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement, which has organized twenty thousand rallies around the world in every country save North Korea, sp...